OpenStack Designate: Enabling DNS as a Service

OpenStack Designate provides DNS as a Service (DNSaaS) in OpenStack. It provides a standard, open API that can be used to program DNS. 

Designate is protected by and integrates with Keystone authentication authorization mechanisms like all OpenStack APIs. The API can be powered by third party DNS providers such as PowerDNS, Infoblox, etc., as well as “batteries-included” multicast DNS (mDNS) implementation provided by OpenStack.

Integrating a self-service DNS like Designate in your cloud experience comes with many advantages. As an IT provider, you can deploy Designate in your infrastructure along with other OpenStack services, plus configure it so that it uses your own DNS backend. Designate empowers users to create their own DNS records, while ensuring these records do not collide with each other.

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Transcript of Video:

Sachin: [00:18] Today, I'm going to talk about the DNS service in OpenStack called Designate. I also talk about the benefits of integrating a self-service DNS in your Cloud experience. Designate is an open source project under the OpenStack umbrella, which provides DNS services. It is a standard open API, just like all other OpenStack services and that API can be borrowed by third party DNS providers like PowerDNS, Infoblox, and so on, as well as an inbuilt implementation that OpenStack providers called mDNS. Let's dive a little bit deeper and understand the Designate project. Designate is an OpenStack project, which provides their DNS as a service. It's a project which is like all of the OpenStack projects. It integrates with the keystone authentication authorization mechanisms and interestingly, it is a multi-tenant API, which means that the users of Designate, can use the same backend within their own project or tenant, without colliding with each other and it is a great capability to have to enable self-service. As an IT provider, you can deploy Designate in your infrastructure along with other OpenStack services, configure it, so that it can use your one DNS as backend. Designate empowers users to create their own DNS records and at the same time, makes sure that the DNS records created by OpenStack users don't collide with each other.

Sachin: [02:08] Designate also integrates well with Neutron, which is a networking service in OpenStack. With Designate, you can assign DNS names to individual floating IPs created in Neutron as well as assign DNS domain names to networks in Neutron, which means that all the VMs which are connected to that network, get a unique DNS name based on their domain that has been assigned to that network. There are many benefits of using the DNS with OpenStack, such as self service as well as the capability to use it flexibly anywhere, along with other OpenStack services.

Sachin: [02:56] Platform9's Manage OpenStack offering includes Designate as a service. The users from Platform9 simply configure their backend DNS and connect it to the Platform9's DNS API and after that, the monitoring and management of the OpenStack service is handled seamlessly by Platform9. After this, provisioning our DNS domain becomes as simple as provisioning our workshare network using Neutron with Platform9 OpenStack.

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